Interviews The First Class Diary

First Class Diary: A gap in learning is created when there is no application- OI  

First Class Diary: A gap in learning is created when there is no application- OI

Hello my amazing readers, how have you been? It’s the last episode for the march series and also the end of the first quarter. My guest, Iyanu-Oluwa believes that a gap in learning is created when there is no application.

In her words,

In school, students are taught theoretical concepts that will be applied in the corporate world. It is essential to find ways to apply what has been taught in school. Application of these concepts can be done through internship programmes while in school. A gap in learning is created when there is no application.

 Enjoy!

Abigael Taiwo of Edugist: Please share with Edugist, a little about your background.

Olusola Iyanu-Oluwa: My name is Olusola Iyanu-Oluwa.  I am from a family of six (two brothers and a sister) and a native of Ondo State, Nigeria. I’m an accounting graduate from Pan-Atlantic University where I emerged as the overall best graduating student of my set.

I am a qualified Chartered accountant of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Nigeria (ICAN). Currently, I work as a pre-NYSC financial analyst intern at Aspire Power Solutions.

 

AT: Was there any motivating factor(s) that influenced your choice of discipline and institution?

OI: To be honest, I did not have a concrete idea of what I wanted to do. I was interested in accounting, finance and economics. Personally, I love working with numbers and accounting seemed like the best fit at the time.

My friend told me about Pan-Atlantic University and spoke highly of the institution. I was majorly interested in the opportunities provided by the university to learn outside the class room.

 

AT: There are two major skills that every student must possess: COMPETENCE and PERFORMANCE. While competence revolves around skill acquisition, performance is much more concerned about skills application. It is believed that most graduates are competent because their academic performance testifies to this, but they are performance-challenged. This poor performance ipso facto hinders them from getting lucrative jobs in the labour market.  What can you say about this assertion?

OI:

In school, students are taught theoretical concepts that will be applied in the corporate world. It is essential to find ways to apply what has been taught in school. Application of these concepts can be done through internship programmes while in school. A gap in learning is created when there is no application.

 

AT: What do you think is responsible for competence without performance? Please suggest ways of improving the performance level of university students and graduates.

OI: I believe that university students can increase their performance by embarking on summer internships and training themselves through online courses and professional certifications to improve their skills. In my own case, I interned in my second and third year.  I realized that my first internship experience improved the next internship experience and I was able to build my job skills.

 

AT: Achievement in life transcends one’s personal efforts. There were people who, during your programme, rendered some assistance that made your dreams a reality. Who are specific persons whose contribution you can’t forget in your first-class feat?

OI: A lot of people contributed to my achievements. I appreciate my parents, siblings, friends, and mentors for being the best support system.

 

AT: As a first-class graduate, are you currently gainfully employed?

OI: Yes, I am currently employed at Aspire Power Solutions as a financial analyst intern. It has been a wonderful experience working for a renewable energy company.

 

AT: Do you think your grades have or is giving you any major advantage over other graduates with lesser grades?

OI: I will say grades play an important factor but there are other factors such as skills, networking.

 

AT: For students who aspire to graduate with outstanding grade like yours, what would you advise them?

OI: I advise students to trust in God, set goals and not lose hope when things get difficult.

 

AT: What would you advise the government to do to improve the standard of our education system?

OI: In order for the Government to improve the standard of education, I think they need to do the following;

  • Continuously develop teachers through training and development programmes.
  • Provide conducive environment and better infrastructure for learning.
  • Also provide appropriate reward systems for students.

 

AT: Any other thing you would like to share?

OI: It is important to believe that you are capable of doing whatever you set your mind to.

 

That’s it on the series for today. Hope you had a swell time reading? You can read the previous interview here

To be featured in the series, please send a mail to Abby

I am Abigael Taiwo and celebrating excellence is a top priority for me.

iTeach, iSpeak, iTrain, iFacilitate, iWrite, iInterview and iLoveYou all. Smile! See you next week!

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About the author

Abigael Ibikunle

Associate Correspondent at Edugist, Abigael Ibikunle is a Mathematics Education graduate. A professional Journalist and a passionate writer. She can be reached via: abigail@edugist.org/+2347035835612

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