News

NECO Registrar Appeals to FG to Stop Using Maths, English as Criterion for Uni, Poly Admission

The Registrar of the National Examinations Council, NECO, Professor Dantani Ibrahim Wushishi, has advocated the abolition of the policy of using Credits in English Language and Mathematics as the main criterion in admitting students into tertiary institutions.

Speaking at the 2021 Biennial National Conference of the Association of Model Islamic Schools in Minna, the Niger State Capital, the Registrar also called for the establishment of an Examination Offences Tribunal to fast track the trial of offenders and to remove the bottlenecks being experienced in the prosecution of offenders.

In a presentation titled “The Consequences of Examination Malpractice: Closing the Gaps and Incentives for National Growth”, Professor Wushishi said, “The federal government should relax the emphasis on certification and paper qualification for everything in the country; screening of results and certificates of students, workers and public officers should be taken very seriously.”

He noted that the policies, programmes, processes, products and politics of the education sector needed to be overhauled. He added that adequate facilities and infrastructures must be provided in public schools for effective teaching and learning to take place.

The Registrar revealed that Bauchi, Borno, Kano and Kebbi States featured prominently in examination malpractices in the last five years, blaming parents, teachers and the school system for the rise in the act.

He said all hands must be on deck to weed the menace from Nigeria’s educational system.

Also speaking, the Dean, School of Sciences and Technology Education, Federal University of Technology, Minna, Professor Amos Isiaka Gambari, said teachers must be encouraged to adopt modern technologies into their instructional process.

“Government and Educational stakeholders should provide adequate digital literary training for teachers to enable them to integrate technology for effective instructional delivery in this 21st century,” he said.

Delivering a paper titled: “Re-branding Islamic Model Schools for Comprehensive Development of the Child”, Professor Abiodun Musa Aibinu of the Federal University of Technology, Minna, lamented that many graduates of Nigerian Educational institutions could not put into practice what they had studied because the emphasis had always been on certificate rather than practical skills that would help them contribute to national development.

He described the current educational system in the country as dysfunctional, lacking cognant focus on child development and national building.

Support EDUGIST to give education a VOICE in Africa

Education journalism has become highly important in today's world and the need to sustain it has become highly recommended. Hence, accuracy, originality, readability and dependability becomes a must. Without adequate resources, dependability may not be able to stand the test of time.

To be relevant is to keep meeting the needs of the readers. Help us stay relevant by donating to our course. With as little as $10/N5000, you can support us in ensuring that we keep publishing accurate, original, readable and dependable educational contents for your views.

About the author

Akeem Alao

Akeem Alao trained as a language teacher. He graduated from Adeniran Ogunsanya college of Education where he studied English/Yoruba Languages and Ekiti State University where he obtained a degree in English Education.

Leave a Comment

error: Content is protected !!